Believe it or not, we can (kind of) measure the air pressure of early Earth! Blue-green algae's response to different nitrogen pressures may tell us what fossils to look for and what those fossils tell us about ancient air pressure.

Blue-green algae’s response to different nitrogen pressures may tell us what fossils to look for and what those fossils tell us about ancient air pressure.

Parkinson’s disease and your appendix High levels of improperly shaped proteins in the appendix may be an indicator of Parkinson's disease in the brain.

Researchers found higher levels of mis-folded proteins in the appendix of Parkinson’s patients compared to healthy controls. The researchers suggest that this finding of alpha-synuclein in the appendix may mean that misfolded alpha-synuclein can travel from the appendix to the brain as one of the potential mechanisms that leads to Parkinson’s disease.

When it comes to buying seafood, there are five kinds of people. Which one are you? Consumers are becoming more conscious than ever about their food, and companies are following their lead by finding out what matters to them.

What makes a person choose a certain kind of fish when shopping at the grocery store? A group of German researchers surveyed shoppers to better understand their buying decisions. This makes it easier for aquaculture farmers to be profitable and consumers to be satisfied.

Does the age of grapes impact the smell of your wine? Different stages of Cabernet Sauvignon and Riesling grape development are associated with quite a few changes in wine aroma.

Different stages of Cabernet Sauvignon and Riesling grape development are associated with quite a few changes in wine aroma.

Where Have All the Passenger Pigeons Gone? Researchers may have uncovered how the once numerous bird went extinct in only 100 years

Up to about 200 years ago, the passenger pigeon was one of the most numerous vertebrate animals on Earth. The species had an estimated 3 to 5 billion individuals at the peak of its existence and had such big flock READ MORE

Using Computers to Identify Deadly Bacteria Japanese researchers develop a machine learning tool to identify deadly bacteria species based on their unique growth characteristics.

Various industries rely on accurate detection and identification of bacterial species. For example, food-processing plants often have to test their products for bacterial contamination to ensure it is safe for human consumption. In hospitals, a quick and accurate method to READ MORE