Young forests suck up more carbon dioxide than old forests

WOODS HOLE, Mass.— As forests age, their ability to grow decreases, a new study by Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientists and colleagues has determined. Since most U.S. forests are maturing from regeneration that began about 100 years ago when extensive READ MORE

Modern ocean acidification is outpacing ancient acidification upheaval

Some 56 million years ago, a massive pulse of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere sent global temperatures soaring. In the oceans, carbonate sediments dissolved, some organisms went extinct and others evolved. Scientists have long suspected that ocean acidification caused the READ MORE

Preserving Cuttlefish and a Valuable Fishing Industry Cooperating with cuttlefish fishermen to help preserve cuttlefish eggs and fisherman livelihood proves challenging.

Once upon a time, in a sea far far away, called Adriatic Sea, there were many cuttlefish. These delicate creatures spent their short life in the deep but before dying, they began a journey to a special place: the lagoon. This sheltered habitat READ MORE

Winter’s Cold Can’t Stop Me, Baby: Migrating Birds Don’t Duet It turns out, species that migrate together don't sing together.

In “Ain’t no Mountain High Enough,” Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell sing “If you ever need a helping hand, I’ll be there on the double, just as fast as I can”, and later, “all winter’s cold can’t stop me, baby.” It’s a beautiful duet. READ MORE

Hawaiian Fishes Like it Deep Coral reef twilight zone acts as a “locals only” hangout for Hawaiian coral reef fishes.

As if Hawaii didn’t already have enough to boast about – beautiful beaches, luscious green mountains, and lava – it now also wears the crown for the highest recorded levels of endemic coral reef fishes in the world.  In Hawaii, “endemic” fishes, READ MORE

How to Find Large Animals by Tracking Dung Beetles The higher the percentage of fossilized dung beetles, the more ancient dung and the greater the number of large animals.

Big animals make lots of dung. And where there’s dung, there’s dung beetles. Researchers counted fossilized dung beetles to figure out the quantity of megafauna–animals weighing 97 pounds or more–at 98 sites from four time periods in Great Britain. The READ MORE

Who’s the Living Fossil? The genus Crocodylus is Younger Than We Think! All of the species of true crocodile we see today most likely shared a single common ancestor only 14 to 8 million years ago - before the arrival of humans.

What comes to mind when you think of crocodiles? You might think of ancient reptiles, or “living fossils,” that have been around, little changed, since the time of dinosaurs. It is true that crocodile-like species (Pseudosuchia) have been around since READ MORE

One tree likes seabird poop, the next prefers fresh air. Researchers found that non-nitrogen fixing trees become more abundant closer to the sea, replacing the usually more abundant nitrogen fixing trees in Peru deserts.

Off the west coast of Peru, seabirds deposit thick layers of guano that accumulates on the ground because of the lack of rain. Guano has historically played a key role in agriculture worldwide because it is rich in plant nutrients such as nitrogen READ MORE

Hitting the jackpot — a new vertebrate family endemic to West Africa

Biological classification arranges taxa according to their degree of relationship; several species may be grouped in a genus, several genera may be grouped in a family, etc. Higher-level systematics in amphibians is relatively stable and taxonomic novelties above the species level are rare. Discovering READ MORE