Did Humans Really Kill Most of the Animals and Plants? We may be the most successful land mammal, but pound for pound, plants and bacteria still have us beat.

We may be the most successful land mammal, but pound for pound, plants and bacteria still have us beat.

Detecting Toxins Produced by Algae A portable tool for detecting the cyanobacteria toxin responsible for harmful algal blooms in drinking water sources may be soon on its way

Harmful algal blooms are becoming an increasing problem in areas around the world, including the Great Lakes, where drinking water is obtained from surface water sources, such as lakes and rivers. When agricultural nutrients and urban waste runoff enters these READ MORE

Babies Learn About Eye Contact Early in Life More evidence shows that socializing is an important human behavior for brain development, even for infants.

As infants, we absorb any information our surroundings have to offer, especially if other humans are involved. Infants can recognize their native language, the faces of their own species, and even the faces of their own race. It’s all part READ MORE

Effects of Gender and Alcohol Use on US Veterans with HIV Female veterans have poorer HIV outcomes than male veterans, and alcohol use hurts HIV outcomes regardless of gender.

While many people might not think that HIV is a large problem in the United States, at the end of 2015 over 1.1 million Americans were living with HIV. Of these people living with HIV in the United States, 75% READ MORE

Bulking Up: Increasing Muscle Mass in Fish with Gene Editing Researchers increase the amount of edible flesh in red sea bream by editing the gene for a hormone that restricts muscle growth

There may be concerns with genetically modified organisms (GMO), but the effectiveness of gene editing in developing more productive plants and animals for the agriculture industry can not be argued. With the rise of cheap and simple gene editing technologies, READ MORE

How Humans Can Influence Evolution of Other Species Scientists recently published an analysis of how humans affect evolution, and why we should care

by Matthew D’Ambrosio Guest Contributor In biology, evolution is how populations change over time from their common ancestor. This process has been happening on Earth since life first began, over 3.5 billion years ago. Evolution, however; is not driven by one factor, READ MORE

Three For The Price of One: Testing Sustainable Aquaculture Systems Growing multiple species in one system saves water, reduces effluent waste, and produces more food

Integrated Multitrophic Aquaculture (IMTA) may be the future of aquaculture. Compared to traditional farms that only grow one species, IMTA farms produce multiple edible products and provide increased sustainability. These integrated systems use the waste products from one species to READ MORE

How Bacteria Platoons Communicate to Conquer How bacteria called Pseudomonas communicate with each other during infection

The more we know about how pathogenic bacteria arrive to and colonize our bodies, the better we can take measures to help our immune system combat them. While most bacteria that we coexist with are beneficial to us or at READ MORE

Cave Bears Probably Did Eat Their Vegetables Isotope analysis indicates that the prehistoric cave bear diet was much more reliant on plants than previously thought

Modern bears, while typically thought of as carnivores, actually have a wide variety of dietary preferences. Some eat only meat while others are omnivores, meaning that they eat both meat and vegetation. Cave bears (Ursus spelaeus), an extinct bear species READ MORE