Did Humans Really Kill Most of the Animals and Plants? We may be the most successful land mammal, but pound for pound, plants and bacteria still have us beat.

We may be the most successful land mammal, but pound for pound, plants and bacteria still have us beat.

Detecting Toxins Produced by Algae A portable tool for detecting the cyanobacteria toxin responsible for harmful algal blooms in drinking water sources may be soon on its way

Harmful algal blooms are becoming an increasing problem in areas around the world, including the Great Lakes, where drinking water is obtained from surface water sources, such as lakes and rivers. When agricultural nutrients and urban waste runoff enters these READ MORE

How Humans Can Influence Evolution of Other Species Scientists recently published an analysis of how humans affect evolution, and why we should care

by Matthew D’Ambrosio Guest Contributor In biology, evolution is how populations change over time from their common ancestor. This process has been happening on Earth since life first began, over 3.5 billion years ago. Evolution, however; is not driven by one factor, READ MORE

Three For The Price of One: Testing Sustainable Aquaculture Systems Growing multiple species in one system saves water, reduces effluent waste, and produces more food

Integrated Multitrophic Aquaculture (IMTA) may be the future of aquaculture. Compared to traditional farms that only grow one species, IMTA farms produce multiple edible products and provide increased sustainability. These integrated systems use the waste products from one species to READ MORE

Coral Is Sensitive to Small Changes in Ocean Temperature A new study using satellite data shows that the landmark 2015-2016 bleaching event on the Great Barrier Reef was more extreme than we thought

by Robert Emberson Guest Contributor Imagine wandering through a vast desert, empty for thousands of miles in every direction. Think about the relief and joy you’d feel to encounter an oasis full of life. Swimming through the open ocean, bumping READ MORE

Food or Foul? Aquaculture Pests May Actually be a Valuable Resource. Small invertebrates that grow around fish farms may provide a sustainable and nutritious food source

Many marine organisms have a planktonic form. This means that they drift in the ocean for part of their life until they can find something suitable to attach to and grow. A common example of an animal like this would READ MORE

Cheese, Wine, and …. Fungi? Fungi play a major role in the making of some of our favorite foods

From mushrooms, cheese, and bread to beer, wine, and sake, fungi play an important role in the foods we eat, whether we know it or not. These incredible organisms and their products can be great food sources that are packed READ MORE

Compostable Flower Pots Made From Pineapple Waste This new material reduces the need for plastics and adds nutrients to soil, while adding economic value to what was previously thrown away!

When life gives you lemons, sell them and buy a pineapple. Davin Turney couldn’t have put it any better. The versatile pineapple is a powerhouse of nutrients, and even its rugged skin and leaves have found applications ranging from renewable READ MORE

Pesticide Exposure is Harmful for Queen Bees Bumblebee queens are negatively impacted by exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides

Bees are important pollinators for plants not only in our home gardens, but in productive agricultural fields and natural environments around the world. If you’ve heard the phrase, ‘Save the Bees!’ at some point, it’s because some bee populations are READ MORE

Sunscreen: Hero for Humans, Villain for Marine Life? Choosing an eco-friendly sunscreen may help prevent harm to marine life.

Have you ever spent extra time at the store trying to decide which sunscreen to purchase? We try to protect ourselves from the Sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays to minimize the risks of contracting skin cancer or photoaging (changes to skin READ MORE